Newcrosshealthcare employee review – £50 fine for being ill?

 

Mostly good, too corporate. A very “mixed” four years.

newcrossWhen I first joined, the Brighton branch was run by a very good manager. For the likes of me (healthcare assistant and support worker, on and off for twenty years, including a great deal of agency experience) and qualified RGNs, there was plenty of work available (mostly in care homes) and we were very well supported. After the manager suddenly left, things went slowly downhill. They’ve recently closed the Brighton branch, running any remaining business from Eastbourne.

Pros and cons

Holiday pay is included in the hourly rate. Pay is not bad but they pull a bit of a fast one by including “holiday pay” in the hourly rates. It may look as though you are being paid more than other care agencies – often around £8.00 for day shifts (below a real living wage), more for nights and weekends – it’s actually about the same or slightly less than other agencies.

Variable management. At least at the branch where I was. One stand-in manager was extremely insensitive during an annual staff review and I made my feelings clear to her and to the regional manager at the time. Newcross can be overly corporate, the word care in Newcrosshealthcare is sometimes overlooked – I had to stand up to them a few times.

newcross2The £50 fine “cancellation fee”, including if you are ill! What on earth are they on about!? It may discourage people from phoning in sick last minute but it really upsets and undermines staff. Fortunately, I’m in good health so this outrageous policy only affected me a couple of times. On more than one occasion, I worked with Newcross staff who had come into work with stinking flu in a care home, rather than go through the hassle of the £50 cancellation process i.e. getting a refund after a doctor’s note.

The call centre in Devon is sometimes at odds with the local branch. At one stage I put in a complaint about an incredibly rude and unprofessional call worker. At other times I would ring in to register my availability (Newcross tend to be a bit obsessed with this) and would later find out that it hadn’t been put on the system. On the whole though, most staff were doing a good job, some were lovely people.

Continually recruiting new staff when there aren’t enough shifts for existing staff. Newcross regularly sent me enthusiastic text messages, reminding me how I can earn a bonus for recommending people to work locally. Fair enough if there was plenty of work to go round but this was often far from the case!

newcrosstwitterMostly good but too corporate. Newcross sometimes seem a bit too concerned with their self-described corporate mission “to dominate the market”, rather than respecting their staff at all levels. Despite that, thank you to them for helping me pay the bills for the last four years, I made some good friends and enjoyed much of the work particularly the many regular homes and clients. I know from experience that some agencies are worse. I’m now at a smaller, more local agency which is generally a bit more human.

A shortened version of the above has been posted on indeed.co.uk, the job website.

Healthcare assistants do the care, nurses do the paperwork

Healthcare assistants, not nurses, often do most of the front-line work

Healthcare assistants, not nurses, often do most of the actual care in the UK

In nearly twenty years of part-time and full-time work as an agency healthcare assistant (HCA), I have worked with many qualified nurses in care homes and hospitals who do an excellent job caring for residents and patients. In many situations however, it is the regular staff HCAs who are doing the hard work.

Due to increasing awareness of an ageing population, it is only now being acknowledged that much of the nitty-gritty hands-on caring for the elderly (be it in their own homes, nursing homes or hospitals), is actually done by “unskilled” HCAs and carers on little more than the minimum wage. Drastic cuts in social care budgets and other political problems are not helping the system as a whole. The Tory government have made a belated but predictably inadequate attempt to improve the general low pay situation in the last budget but there is still a long way to go. £9.00 per hour by 2020, excluding those under 25? Not good enough, not nearly good enough. In the meantime, most carers struggle on with around £7.00 per hour. Due to existing financial pressures, many local trusts, councils and care providers are not happy about having to give carers any kind of pay rise at all. However, as they are such caring folk, the many Chief Executives of organizations profiting from care will of course be taking cuts in their six figure salaries. Of course!

What does a healthcare assistant actually do? The underpaid, undervalued and “unskilled” work of caring for your parents, your grandparents and possibly YOU one day

The infamous Bristol Stool Chart

The infamous Bristol Stool Chart

As anyone who has worked in care and nursing knows, the supposedly unskilled work of an HCA can be physically, mentally, emotionally and even spiritually demanding in the extreme. During a 12 hour care home or hospital shift, particularly early shifts, there can be a massive amount of practical multitasking. Waking the patient or resident gently (“We have to get this lady up because her family insists on it, even though she hates getting up at this time.”), moving of heavy hoists in restricted spaces (“Why can’t they do something about these flipping leads in the way under the bed?”), toileting (“Here we go… nice and tall… ouch there goes my back again!”), wiping bottoms (“Excellent bowel action, 3 on the Bristol Stool Chart!”), washing (“There’s no soap again…”), shaving (“Gunged up blunt razor blade, I’ll have a hunt round for a new one…”), dressing (“Mind she doesn’t get another skin tear. Why hasn’t this lady got any clean knickers?”), helping with eating and drinking (“Thickened fluids… Thick and Easy? That’s just the staff!”) and so on. All the time you try to remain friendly and supportive to everyone around you, in an often extremely stressful environment.

In the meantime, the qualified nurses on a much better wage are usually getting on with dispensing medication, paperwork and attending meetings

NursesPaperworkWhich is sometimes important work in itself but this reality completely put me off the idea of qualifying as a nurse, a long time ago. (I’m not a big fan of western medicine and the very dodgy pharmaceutical industry anyway – but that’s another story!) From a 2013 Royal College of Nursing study:- “More than three quarters of nurses said the time spent completing paperwork prevented them from attending to patients.” Financially of course, qualified nurses get a relatively good deal compared to carers, starting at over £20,000 in the NHS. But it might be wise to remember who is often doing most of the hard physical and emotional work – and who is often being diabolically paid for it and sometimes being taken advantage of by their employers. Finally, a carer has recently taken a company to court for failure to pay the minimum wage.

Over the last few years, at last, there has rightly been plenty of mainstream media coverage about the problems with abuse and poor standards of care. More relatives are complaining to the Care Quality Commission. But beyond the moral outrage, isn’t it time we all started digging a bit deeper into some of the causes of these problems – the cultural attitudes and political decisions behind them – and did something about it? Why, for example, aren’t the still increasing numbers of foreign care assistants required to take a basic English test? Filipinos and Polish workers in particular can be more committed and better at the job but I have lost count of the number of times I’ve heard “It’s so nice to have a conversation with someone who speaks proper English”, from a resident or patient.

Be it in home care, nursing homes or hospitals, many of the (mainly female) staff are exhausted, demoralized and broke. Profits are still being made by many private companies who often pay their staff less than can be earned in supermarkets or factories. The situation is not anything like as extreme in many other countries and the whole culture needs to change here.

Carers, our parents, and our grandparents deserve better.