Justice for Ernest John Coles – the crimes of Sanctuary Care?

PleaseHelpMeThis document has been received and signed for in the following offices:

Devon County Council, The Police, The Doctor involved, Sanctuary Care and CQC head office.
House of Commons and NHSLA, pending, not yet signed for…

Letter of Notification of a Pre-Action Protocol for the Resolution of Clinical Disputes
Date of claim: 20th October 2015.
Copied to the NHS Litigation Authority
Associated bodies
Rachel Chalmers, DC for vulnerable adults Rachel Doyle, CQC Inspector
CQC Enquiry Number – 2186209966
Claim
Failure to comply with the Health and social care Act 2008 Regulation 20 Breach of duty of care to both Mr and Mrs Coles
Claimant:
Ernest John Coles of 7 Lichfield Road, Redhills, Exwick, EX4 2EU
on behalf of his late wife Marguerite Coles who passed away in Greenslades Nursing home on the 9th of December 2013
Defendants:
Responsible for the care of his late wife and failing to provide information.
Mark Mc Carthy, Head of Sanctuary Care
Natasha Knowles, business manager for Sanctuary Care
David Berenski previous Manager of Greenslades nursing home Alison Robertson Previous manageress of Greensalades Nursing home Dr.Carl Bracey, responsible doctor for Greenslades Nursing home, Foxhayes Surgery
Phil Norrey, CEO Devon County Council
…………………………….

Ernest John Coles

Ernest John Coles

On the 25th of August 2015 a letter was sent to Mark McCarthy, head of Sanctuary Care requesting an explanation to why the care plan of the late Marguerite Coles states that it has been “rewritten.”
The letter was received in their Worcester office and the signature documented by the post office is “Gormley.”
It was also acknowledged by email to myself but not to Mr Coles. Email content :

Dear Ms Wakefield,
Thank you for your email dated 25 September.
I am emailing to confirm receipt and to assure you that Mr Coles’ letter of 25 August is being dealt with professionally and that a response will be sent within the 30 days that was requested.
Kind regards, Natasha

Natasha Knowles BA (Hons), PGCE, CPE – Law
Business Manager
Sanctuary Care Limited
Cameo House, Chamber Court, Castle Street, Worcester, WR1 3ZQ.
Tel: 01905 334243 (Internal: 34243)
Fax: 01905 21019
Email: Natasha.Knowles@sanctuary-housing.co.uk
“Keeping kindness at the heart of our care.”
Sanctuary Care is part of Sanctuary Group

Unfortunately they have failed to act professionally and failed to deliver an explanation on the deadline given. I have followed them up with a phone call and I was informed that the lady dealing with this matter is on annual leave and that no one is covering her duties.
This case is as Im sure you are aware, a matter of public interest and grave concern.
In order to restore faith in the public services provided by all of the organizations involved in this matter there needs to be a thorough investigation in to this case. If the handling of this case is a reflection of the standard of care given to the vulnerable people that you are all responsible for protecting then it sheds huge concern over the services provided.

Ernest2Mr Coles is seeking further specialist legal advice in this matter as he is the legal representative of his late wife and has a grant of probate in safekeeping. As it is a crime to falsify medical notes and care plans we expect your professional response in this investigation of serious concern and provide us with a satisfactory outcome in order to restore the trust of the public who pay for the system in place.

We look forward to resolving this matter as quickly as possible as you are already responsible for the mistreatment of Mr. Coles as he is in his own right a vulnerable adult. I would also like to remind you that both Mr and Mrs Coles both gave up their retirement to work voluntarily for the NHS and to be repaid by society in this way is unforgivable and will not be forgotten.

A response from this pre-action letter is required within the standard time frame of 20 days by all involved without exception.

Samantha Wakefield

Facebook page Justice for Ernest John Coles

Healthcare assistants do the care, nurses do the paperwork

Healthcare assistants, not nurses, often do most of the front-line work

Healthcare assistants, not nurses, often do most of the actual care in the UK

In nearly twenty years of part-time and full-time work as an agency healthcare assistant (HCA), I have worked with many qualified nurses in care homes and hospitals who do an excellent job caring for residents and patients. In many situations however, it is the regular staff HCAs who are doing the hard work.

Due to increasing awareness of an ageing population, it is only now being acknowledged that much of the nitty-gritty hands-on caring for the elderly (be it in their own homes, nursing homes or hospitals), is actually done by “unskilled” HCAs and carers on little more than the minimum wage. Drastic cuts in social care budgets and other political problems are not helping the system as a whole.

The Tory government have made a belated but predictably inadequate attempt to improve the general low pay situation in the last budget but there is still a long way to go. £9.00 per hour by 2020, excluding those under 25? Not good enough, not nearly good enough. In the meantime, most carers struggle on with around £7.00 per hour. Due to existing financial pressures, many local trusts, councils and care providers are not happy about having to give carers any kind of pay rise at all. However, as they are such caring folk, the many Chief Executives of organizations profiting from care will of course be taking cuts in their six figure salaries. Of course!

What does a healthcare assistant actually do? The underpaid, undervalued and “unskilled” work of caring for your parents, your grandparents and possibly YOU one day

The infamous Bristol Stool Chart

The infamous Bristol Stool Chart

As anyone who has worked in care and nursing knows, the supposedly unskilled work of an HCA can be physically, mentally, emotionally and even spiritually demanding in the extreme. During a 12 hour care home or hospital shift, particularly early shifts, there can be a massive amount of practical multitasking…

Waking the patient or resident gently (“We have to get this lady up because her family insists on it, even though she hates getting up at this time.”), moving of heavy hoists in restricted spaces (“Why can’t they do something about these flipping leads in the way under the bed?”), toileting (“Here we go… nice and tall… ouch there goes my back again!”), wiping bottoms (“Excellent bowel action, 3 on the Bristol Stool Chart!”), washing (“There’s no soap again…”), shaving (“Gunged up blunt razor blade, I’ll have a hunt round for a new one…”), dressing (“Mind she doesn’t get another skin tear. Why hasn’t this lady got any clean knickers?”), helping with eating and drinking (“Thickened fluids… Thick and Easy? That’s just the staff!”) and so on.

All the time you try to remain friendly and supportive to everyone around you, in an often extremely stressful environment.

In the meantime, the qualified nurses on a much better wage are usually getting on with dispensing medication, paperwork and attending meetings

NursesPaperworkWhich can be important work in itself but this reality completely put me off the idea of qualifying as a nurse, a long time ago. (I’m not a big fan of western medicine and the very dodgy pharmaceutical industry anyway – but that’s another story!) From a 2013 Royal College of Nursing study:- “More than three quarters of nurses said the time spent completing paperwork prevented them from attending to patients.” Financially of course, qualified nurses get a relatively good deal compared to carers, starting at over £20,000 in the NHS. But it might be wise to remember who is often doing most of the hard physical and emotional work – and who is often being diabolically paid for it and sometimes being taken advantage of by their employers. Finally, a carer has recently taken a company to court for failure to pay the minimum wage.

Over the last few years, at last, there has rightly been plenty of mainstream media coverage about the problems with abuse and poor standards of care. More relatives are complaining to the Care Quality Commission. But beyond the moral outrage, isn’t it time we all started digging a bit deeper into some of the causes of these problems – the cultural attitudes and political decisions behind them – and did something about it? Why, for example, aren’t the still increasing numbers of foreign care assistants required to take a basic English test? Filipinos and Polish workers in particular can be more committed and better at the job but I have lost count of the number of times I’ve heard “It’s so nice to have a conversation with someone who speaks proper English”, from a resident or patient.

Be it in home care, nursing homes or hospitals, many of the (mainly female) staff are exhausted, demoralized and broke. Profits are still being made by many private companies who often pay their staff less than can be earned in supermarkets or factories. The situation is not anything like as extreme in many other countries and the whole culture needs to change here.

Carers, our parents, and our grandparents deserve better.

Sanctuary’s neglect of the elderly and vulnerable

The uselessness, lies, rudeness, threats, bullying and generally corrupt behaviour of Sanctuary Housing Group (includes Sanctuary Housing Association, Sanctuary Care, Sanctuary Management Services and others) over the last few years are extensively documented in a large number of personal accounts from people across England and Scotland on my previous blog Are Sanctuary Housing above the law? Sanctuary’s unprofessional and excessively corporate behaviour (at times, corporate fascism would seem to be a fair description) continues to affect many – tenants, relatives, students, property-owning neighbours, their own front line employees, and others. Over the last few months, there have been the following complaints in press articles from around the country:-

Maureen Cox, three months with no heating and asbestos

Maureen Cox, 76, three months with asbestos and no heating

Terry McGuire, 82, not on £310,000

Terry McGuire, 82, not on £310,000

In Oxford, a great-grandmother was found to be living without heating in a Sanctuary property with asbestos for three months (November 2013). On the edge of Birmingham, a CQC report revealed that Sanctuary Care, which owns and runs 60 care homes, had put residents ‘at risk of receiving unsafe care and treatment’ because of staff shortages (November). A Cambridge newspaper article: Family plead to be moved from their ‘hell hole’ Sanctuary Housing home (December). The Banbury Guardian had a woman’s three-year wait for house repairs and in the Hemel Hempstead area there were pensioners asking why a security light repair took four months (January 2014). Yes, I think we are getting the picture! Back in Oxford again, last month, a family’s possessions were taken to the tip after a garage mix-up and just a few days ago in Liverpool, a Wirral pensioner slept rough outside his doorstep after being evicted by Sanctuary.

David Bennett, Sanctuary Chief Executive on £310,000

David Bennett, Sanctuary Chief Executive, on £310,000

Whilst they may do great work in some areas, the above instances would appear to be the tip of the Sanctuary iceberg, as can be seen from other blogs here and elsewhere. This widespread neglect of the elderly and vulnerable is coming from a company that has charity status, that made a “surplus” (i.e. profit) of £72 million last year, a company that currently pays its Chief Executive David Bennett £310,000 per year.

They need to be stopped.

 

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